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Shark researchMarch 28, 2013

Three nights a month research staff and citizen scientists keep tabs on shark movements in the Reserve, and last week's excursion could not have been better. In addition to enjoying a balmy March evening with a marvelous sunset, the crew captured three bonnethead sharks, one lemon shark, and a cow-nosed ray, and NO MOSQUITOES! Learn about shark monitoring and how the data is used here.

 

Kayak Tour at Rookery Bay ReserveOn March 31, 2013, Rookery Bay Reserve received a visit from Alicia Taggio, a Social Media Specialist with Flight Centre Canada. She wrote a descriptive blog entry about her experience on one of the Reserve's kayak tours through the mangroves and even made a short video of the tour!

Watch the video or view the blog entry

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: March 29, 2013
CONTACT: DEP Press Office

Girls in Science Day15 LOCAL STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN
"GIRLS IN SCIENCE DAY" AT ROOKERY BAY RESERVE

~Hands-on activities teach students about marine life
at the Reserve~

NAPLES – Fifteen Collier County students middle school students particpated in Rookery Bay Reserve's "Girls in Science Day," a day of hands-on learning at the Reserve.

Least Tern PostingMarch 27, 2013

Reserve staff and Team OCEAN volunteers posted a small portion of beach on the south tip of Keewaydin Island and in early April will post part of an emergent sandbar at Cape Romano Shoals. These areas have been posted annually from early April until late August to protect nesting habitat for least terns, black skimmers and Wilson's plover since 2001. They installed informational signs connected by string and flagging to clearly mark closed areas. Two marked crossover trails on the south tip of Keewaydin Island lead beachgoers across the island to access the Gulf-side beach.

Read more about the Reserve's efforts to monitor beach-nesting birds

 

ROOKERY BAY PROVIDES PROTECTION FOR THREATENED BIRD SPECIES

NAPLES –Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (RBNERR), in cooperation with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), has posted a small portion of beach on the south tip of Keewaydin Island and in early April will post part of an emergent sandbar at Cape Romano Shoals. These areas have been posted annually from early April until late August to protect nesting habitat for least terns, black skimmers and Wilson's plover since 2001.

Greg Curry taking photo doumentation of prescribed burn results March 26, 2013

Greg Curry, Rookery Bay Reserve's Resource Management Specialist, returns to document the re-growth progress following the final prescribed burn of the season, two weeks ago. Already, there are signs of new plants sprouting, old plants re-sprouting, and visible wildlife activity in the area.

Visit Rookery Bay Reserve's Prescribed Fire Program webpage to learn more.

Clyde Butcher Photos on Exhibit at Rookery Bay Reserve This Summer

Living Waters: Aquatic Preserves of Florida, a collection of 29 black-and-white photographs by preeminent Florida photographer Clyde Butcher, will be on exhibit from May 2 through Nov. 14 at the Rookery Bay Environmental Learning Center art gallery, 300 Tower Road in Naples. In conjunction with the exhibit, Rookery Bay will show the companion one-hour nature film documentary, "Living Waters: Aquatic Preserves of Florida." The film includes an introduction and closing remarks by Butcher and was produced and directed by cinematographer Elam Stoltzfus. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday through Friday. Call 239-530-5940 or visit rookerybay.org for more information about the exhibit and film viewing schedule.

On March 25, 2013 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) announced its proposal designating critical nesting habitats for loggerhead turtles in the U.S., which includes beaches along 739 miles of coastline from North Carolina to Mississippi. This proposal includes 84% of the entire nesting habitat in the United States. The beach designations will help ensure that sea turtles return to healthy beaches to lay their eggs. Importantly, the designations help highlight the significance of these areas so that the public and city and state governments can better plan coastal activities and mitigate any threats to nesting habitat. Critical habitat does not affect private property, public access or beach activities such as surfing, swimming, fishing and sunbathing. The proposed critical nesting habitats include several beaches within the Reserve, such as: Keewaydin Island, Sea Oat, Cape Romano, and others in the Ten Thousand Islands. This proposal is an excellent example of how the monitoring data collected at the Reserve can translate into species management efforts at a higher level. Read more about this designation and its supporting data and provide your comments on the proposal on or before May 24, 2013 via www.regulations.gov under Docket # FWS-R4-ES-2012-0103.

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